MOMI LEARNS| Lesson from the Miser and His Gold

Mar 7, 2017 | Life, Only Berlin

One Sunday, I went to the boys’ room and saw my Big Bunso counting his savings.  “Wow, you’ve got plenty of savings, my son.  What will you buy or do with your money?” was my question.

My young man looked up at me and said in a timid tone, “Nothing mama.  I just want to save a lot until I got so many money.  I do not want to spend them. Counting my savings makes me happy.”

This did not please Momi Berlin.  Though I am proud that my son knows how to save, I told him the story of The Miser and His Gold.  I hope the story would teach him a lesson just like it taught the miser.

The Miser and His Gold

Aesop for Children: The Miser and His Gold

Aesop for Children: The Miser and His Gold

 

A Miser had buried his gold in a secret place in his garden. Every day he went to the spot, dug up the treasure and counted it piece by piece to make sure it was all there. He made so many trips that a Thief, who had been observing him, guessed what it was the Miser had hidden, and one night quietly dug up the treasure and made off with it.
When the Miser discovered his loss, he was overcome with grief and despair. He groaned and cried and tore his hair.

A passerby heard his cries and asked what had happened.

“My gold! O my gold!” cried the Miser, wildly, “someone has robbed me!”

“Your gold! There in that hole? Why did you put it there? Why did you not keep it in the house where you could easily get it when you had to buy things?”

“Buy!” screamed the Miser angrily. “Why, I never touched the gold. I couldn’t think of spending any of it.”

The stranger picked up a large stone and threw it into the hole.

“If that is the case,” he said, “cover up that stone. It is worth just as much to you as the treasure you lost!”

The Moral

I stressed to my son that just like the miser, there is no harm in saving up for the future.  His act is very commendable, knowing how to save at a very young age.  What made it all wrong is counting his money piece by piece to make sure it was all there, and never thought of anything what to do with it.

“You should save with purpose.  Others save for new rubber shoes, just like your brother. That makes his saving worthwhile.  But keeping your money there with no intention of using it is just useless.  Seeing how it has grown and how many you can amass is just hoarding.  Just like in the Miser and His Gold story, ‘a possession is worth no more than the use we make of it.'”

The realization

My young man must have understood his momma.  He mentioned he wants to come with me on my next visit to the bank to deposit his money.  He knows that each of them has his own bank where we save their money for their education or future use.  And some of it, he decides to buy the newest Diary of the Wimpy Kid copy to complete his collection.

This mother gave a sweet smile to her son and left him as he puts back his money inside his big jar.

 

19 Comments

  1. Amanda-Curly Sue Review

    This is a brilliant story! Saving with “purpose” is soooo important. If you say to a child “You must save your money!” The only thing they think is “Why!?” This story would be very good to teach them that saving is a means to an end, a way to get something special. Thanks for this I will be sure to share it with my friends who are parents!

    Reply
  2. Michelle

    Your boys are all smart! Is big bunso the one who accompanied you last SP Moms Workshop: Raising Toddlers? I saw him reading The Diary of a Wimpy Kid and I even told my husband na sana ganun rin ang aming little kuya in the future. That he likes reading books din just like your son. So I guess, that was the book he bought from his savings then! 😀

    Reply
  3. Meera

    It is the parents responsibility to teach the young ones the value of the money and the purpose of saving. You have made your kid understand them both. Loved this post, especially the way you have composed. It’s quite interesting and it has already achieved its own purpose. Thanks for sharing 🙂

    Reply
  4. Thelittlelai: Beyond limits

    Wow, your son didn’t own the lesson alone, but everyone who read this post. I’m truly learning and just like what you said, there should always be purpose when we save, at least we know where would the saving goes. Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts about handling our saving, I truly appreciate it.

    Reply
    • momiberlin

      Thank you. Yes, purpose makes the difference. a big difference and motivation to save more.

      Reply
  5. Sam @followyouroad

    Great lesson to teach to your son. I learned from school that the savings percentage of Filipinos are only 3%. That means for every PHP 100 we earn, we spend PHP 97 of it. That’s too high and it needs to change. Great that you taught the lesson early on.

    Reply
    • momiberlin

      So sad to hear this that its only 3%. Sana more parents teach the right way of savings to their kids. They will benefit from it in the long run.

      Reply
  6. Amila Wickramarachchi

    well,not only your kid,I also learned a good lesson from this post.Yes,savings should be for a purpose.And at the time I am commenting on this,I use some of my savings for medication of my father.So,I am happy that I have some savings.And I am inspired with this post.Thanks…

    Reply
    • momiberlin

      Thank you. So nice and generous of you to share your savings for your father’s medication 🙂

      Reply
  7. Joanna

    It’s great when you can teach your children lessons through stories. I remember the story about the rich man who buried his money in the garden and it is so true! Yes, it’s responsable to raise money but you should have an aim on what you will use them for. It’s so nice that your child understood this.

    Reply
    • momiberlin

      I agree. There should always be a purpose. Even for each savings needs a purpose to make it more fruitful.

      Reply
  8. Indrani

    What an important lesson of life you have given him! You have given him aim and purpose in life. Sometimes I feel schools too should include a subject in financial management in their curriculum. That too will make a good impact.

    Reply
    • momiberlin

      I agree on the financial management course as well. That would be a great help to parents.

      Reply
  9. Maria

    My mom has instilled the value of saving money for future use. How many time I have tried but I have failed. Though not failed miserably. I’m able to save but I’ll just spend it for utilities or other stuff that would just give temporary happiness for me. I know it’s bad and I think this has made me rethink things again. I wish I could really save this 2017!

    Reply
    • momiberlin

      The mere fact that you realized those purchases are for temporary happiness is a good start to save na. Now, you could identify the necessity from wants. Happy saving!

      Reply
  10. Ferna

    a very striking lesson to learn. it’s good to know about this especially for the kids. I do not have a child of my own yet, and somehow this story not only entails for the child or for the kids but for everyone. A learning we all need to be aware of and a reminder as well if we get lost of what is our purpose in saving. Great one Momi!

    Reply
    • momiberlin

      Thank you. I agree. Stories like this is not just for kids but for everyone. Its lesson is for everyone to learn as well.

      Reply
  11. kareen liez datoy (@blessedliez)

    The story is simple but the lesson is huge! Saving just for nothing is indeed futile but if there is a goal, then there will be a direction for what you are doing. It is good that your kid learned this lesson at an early age. It is really nice reading books like this to our children.

    Reply
    • momiberlin

      I agree. the learnings from these stories are what make them worth reading, plus of course, they are entertaining too.

      Reply

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